Utah Public Radio Interview – Off-Trail Use

Last week, the first paper from my dissertation work was published in the Journal of Environmental Management. If you want some light reading, the paper is open access for the next month or so at this link.  

Utah Public Radio Science Intern, Andrew Durso, interviewed me about my research earlier this week and did a great job! If you would like to listen to/read about some of the key findings of my dissertation you can check out Andrew’s story here:

http://upr.org/post/trail-visitors-stick-together-0

Guest Post at The Eco Tome Blog

I took a break from blogging this Fall while I have been working on another type of outdoor recreation/public lands outreach project with my knitting group. My next blog post will be about this project! I am so excited with how it has turned out.

But this week, I wrote a guest post over at The Eco Tome that is an introduction to recreation ecology and the types of basic questions that we ask in our field.

Go check it (and the other greats posts!) here: http://scifundchallenge.org/ecotome/2016/01/16/where-recreation-ecologists-spend-their-summer-vacation/

As a side note, this collaboration was inspired by a meeting Megan Litwhiler at ComSciCon  Applications for this year’s ComSciCon are being accepted until March 1st.

Finishing My Dissertation and Finding My Park

Friday I turned my dissertation into the library at Utah State. This means that I am officially “Dr. D’Antonio”. As far as I know, I am one of few members of my family to go to college, the first in my family to go to graduate school, and definitely the only one to get a Ph.D. – my parents are super proud. For me, I just feel relieved to have my defense over (I caught a cold and had some technical difficulties so that could have gone better) and my dissertation done. Otherwise I don’t think the whole idea of being “finished” has hit me.  Next week, I officially start a postdoc position at Utah State where my main responsibility will be teaching. I am really excited about this opportunity and it is also allowing my partner and me to delay the inevitable “two-body problem” by at least a year. Before the semester starts though, my first responsibility as a postdoc is a small research project in a place I love. And that is really what this post is about – finding my park.

Sign

 

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Happy 100th Anniversary Rocky Mountain National Park!

When people outside of my field find out that I do research in national parks, inevitably the question of “Do you have a favorite national park?” comes up.  I always have a really hard time choosing; each national park is unique and I honestly I like them all. But when pressed, I usually respond with “It’s a tie between Isle Royale National Park and Rocky Mountain National Park.” I have already done a blog post about why I love Isle Royale National Park. Given that tomorrow is the 100th anniversary of the signing of the legislation that created Rocky Mountain National Park, I figured that I would celebrate it’s centennial by writing a post about why I love Rocky Mountain National Park.

My first visit to Rocky Mountain National Park during a research scoping visit. I am the one on the left looking around in wonder and awe (photo by Annie Weiler).

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Do you play disc-golf? Did you ever consider your environmental impact?

ResearchBlogging.org Back when I lived in Wisconsin, one of my closest friends was the physical education teacher at the school I worked at. At some point during our friendship he invited me to play “disc-golf” with him one day after school.  At the time I had absolutely no clue what he was asking me to do and honestly thought he was making up words. Turns out, disc-golf is an emerging recreational activity that is popular in urban natural areas such as city parks.  Disc-golf is similar to traditional golf but instead of hitting a golf ball into a hole, you throw a frisbee into a chain basket that is raised above the ground.  Like traditional golf courses, disc-golf courses will contain obstacles such as water features, trees, shrubs, etc. In 2011 there were almost 3,000 disc golf courses in the USA (including at least one disc-golf course in Wisconsin!); up from 300 in the later 1980s.  I was actually pretty terrible at disc-golf the one time that I played and most of my throws resulted in the Frisbee being stuck in the trees.

Anyway, back to the research part of this post…emerging recreational activities, like disc-golf, are particularly challenging for managers to deal with. Managers often have to make decisions about how to manage new activities without much information about the social and ecological components of the activity. Therefore, emerging recreational activities can be really interesting topics of study in the field of recreation research. Back in 2013, Yu-Fai Leung and some of his graduate students decided to examine the social and ecological aspects of managing disc-golf activities. They were interested in answering three questions: (1) How does the public perceive disc-golf as a recreational activity? (2) Is there evidence that disc-golf has environmental impacts? and (3) How can this information be used to inform the management of disc-golf?

Tossing a shot into the bucket on the disc golf course at Black Butte Lake, California

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Oversimplification in Recreation Ecology? (Alternative title: ecologists care about recreation ecology!)

ResearchBlogging.org Given that recreation ecology is an emerging field of study, the journals that we publish in – while good and important journals – do not usually have the highest impact factor or are the most widely read.  However, that may be changing! My advisor, Chris Monz and two Australian colleagues, authored the cover article of this month’s issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.  The October 2013 issue also features a Guest Editorial by another well-known recreation ecologist out of Australia – Ralf Buckley.  Frontiers is a journal published by the Ecological Society of America and hopefully the October issue, which puts recreation ecology in the spotlight, will be just the first step in introducing recreation ecology research to a broader scientific audience.

blog_frontiers

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Another Summer, Another Field Season

First new blog post in over a month!  My 6th round of grad school-related summer field work started on July 1st and I feel like June was sucked into some sort of field work preparation black hole.  For the last two weeks of June, I spent pretty much every waking minute preparing for one of the most involved projects that I have worked on thus far.  Usually the data collection needs on my projects require one or two protocols and a few weeks of work.  My latest project, however, requires 6 separate data collection techniques and since I will be leaving a (very capable) field crew up there for two months to take care of most of the data collection I had to be extremely organized this year.   But I will try to not complain about all the work too much – really I should feel privileged that I’ll get to travel to Grand Teton National Park every other week.

The Teton Range from Heron Lake (Coulter Bay area).

The Teton Range from Heron Lake (Coulter Bay area).

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